Knot on the Fabric

Overhand knots on fabric

So now that you know all about making overhand knots, it is time to put them on knit fabric. To test out what was possible I made two swatches, both with a row of elongated stitches (wrap each stitch twice, work only once into the double wrap on the following row) to work the knots along. These two rows were in Stockinette stitch on both swatches, surrounded by garter stitch on one swatch (blue) and Stockinette on the other (purple).

You’ll see double and triple overhand knots on both swatches. You’ll see I also tried several types of embellishing elements. On the blue swatch I used a bulky plied yarn and on the purple swatch I used a worsted single-spun, both on its own and worked into a crochet chain. The latter makes it easier to see what I did to knot on the fabric.

For this tutorial, we’ll be stranding across one stitch and knotting around two. I worked from left to right, but you can work either way, whichever is most comfortable. Thread the crochet chain onto a tapestry needle. Hold the non-working end off the edge of the knit fabric, horizontally to the left as if it were connected to something (in the photo. In the photo, mine is connected to a previous knot.

 

The horizontal strand connects the knot to the previous knot, so be careful you it doesn’t end up being too loose after step 4. You may need to gently redistribute extra length back through the knot itself. As when learning to knit, your fingers need some time to learn how to get the right tension on your knots.

Working with stretchy yarn is more difficult than working with rope, string, and other firm elements. Sometimes a plied yarn can become “unplied” as you tie; try working the knot the other way if this happens (i.e. under then over, rather than over then under). The twist can often be restored by simply letting go of the end so it re-twists itself; barring that try twisting it back yourself.

So what can you do with this knotting technique? How about working it across a couple of square fringed coasters? Tune in next time to see how they turn out!

 

 

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