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Article: Weaving It All Together

“Basket weave, herringbone, slip and wrap stitches, stranded color work turned wrong side out—many knitting techniques allow us to imitate the look of loom-woven fabrics. What if we view our knit fabric as a scaffolding, as warp for weaving on top of and through? In this skill booster we look at techniques of weaving, sewing and embroidery to embellish our knits.”

Accompanying Project: It’s All in the Details Top

Article in Creative Knitting, Summer 2013, Volume 35, No. 2. For more info, click the affiliate link:

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Article: Going In Circles From The Inside Out

“Most knitters learn early on how to work in the round from the outside in—that first hat project teaches us how to decrease and use double-point needles. Knitting in the other direction, from the inside out and using increases to grow our circles (or squares!) may introduce you to a whole new knitting addiction, whether it be making small motifs or large shawls, afghan squares or square afghans.”

Accompanying Project: Circle Those Coasters, Square That Trivet, Downward Spiral Beret and All Squared Away Afghan

Article in Creative Knitting, Autumn 2013, Volume 35, No. 3. For more info, click the affiliate link:

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Article: Building a Log Cabin

Diagram of log cabin construction
Diagrams

“Traditional quilts were made with odds and ends of fabric that were cut and pieced together. One of the best-known block designs is the Log Cabin. It is composed of a center square with tiers of rectangular logs built around it, a structure that lends itself to rhythmic, easy knitting with beautiful results.”  Photo credit: Kellie Nuss Photography

Accompanying Project: Streak of Lightning Afghan

Creative Knitting Magazine presents: All Season Throws, October 2013

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Article: Practical Pleats, Wondrous Welts

“Go from ordinary to extraordinary and learn how to create pleats and welts. This tutorial will guide you through theses easy techniques, allowing you to add intriguing surface decoration to the simplest designs. Pleat and tuck techniques allow us to fold knit fabric back on itself, creating flaps and corded ridges.”

Accompanying Project: Pretty Peaks and Valleys Jacket

Article in Creative Knitting, Winter 2013, Volume 35, No. 4. For more info, click the affiliate link:

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Article: I-Cord Basics & Beyond

“The humble tube of knitting first christened Idiot’s Delight and later shortened to I-cord by Elizabeth Zimmerman has a multitude of uses. As an edging, you can pick up stitches in it, work it on selvages as you go, or attach it later around the outside. It is a great way to put leftover bits of yarn to good use.”

Article in Creative Knitting Magazine presents: Just-in-Time Knits, April 2015

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Tutorial: Joined With a Twist

Illustration from Joined with a Twist tutorial“Some years ago I came across a scarf with vertical stripes of color created using separate balls of yarn joined with intarsia techniques. I wanted to make a cowl with the same vertical stripes, but I didn’t want to have 16 balls of yarn hanging off my needles! Rummaging through my mental techniques toolbox, I found the slip-stitch join-as-you-go techniques used here.”

Accompanying Project: Joined with a Twist Cowl

Creative Knitting Magazine presents: Wraps, Capelets & Cowls, Fall 2014

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Article: Check the Map!

“The squares of traditional knitting charts provide a graphic representation of knitting instructions. For many stitch patterns, charts resemble the fabric produced when following said instructions: color patterning, cable crossings, groupings of knits and purls are fairly straightforward. But what about patterns that add and subtract stitches, either singly or in groups, all in one row or spread across several? Gridded charts can’t convey the shifting fabric created by such arrangements of stitches.”

Accompanying Project: Hayle Cowl

Article in Creative Knitting, Winter 2014, Volume 36, No. 4. For more info, click the affiliate link:

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Tutorial: Knots in Your Knits

“Knots have been holding things together at least as long as knitting, and the I-cord projects in this issue bring them together. Like knitting, knotting has its own terminology, so here’s a few definitions to get you started.”

Accompanying projects: Knotted necklaces one and two, and a chokerKnotted Coasters and Trivets

Tutorial in Creative Knitting Magazine presents: Just-in-Time Knits, April 2015

Article: Upcycle That Old Sweater

“Add swagger to any project or sweater—handmade or store-bought, firsthand or secondhand—with surface embellishments using that single skein in your stash, notions from your sewing basket, or other bits and pieces too pretty to just throw out. Here are just a few ideas to ignite your imagination!”

Article in Creative Knitting, Summer 2016, Volume 38, No. 2. For more info, click the affiliate link:

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Article: Make Like Weavers Do: Leno!

“Life is busy. Sometimes, we just want plain knitting but we don’t necessarily want a plain sweater! There are many ways to gussy up our garments after the knitting is done, and in this tutorial we’ll explore adding the look of leno to our fabric. Leno is a weaving technique used to create a lacy yet stable fabric. Vertical warp threads are twisted around each other before the horizontal weft is introduced. Imagine marrying knit cables and lace, and you get an idea of what woven leno fabric looks like!”

Accompanying Project: Artisan Tunic

Article in Creative Knitting, Summer 2016, Volume 38, No. 2. For more info, click the affiliate link:

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