Yarn Over Season: Feather Faggoting

Feather Faggoting post

If you are a systematic person you might expect yarn over season to conclude with a stitch pattern that combines a yarn over with a left-slanting purl decrease, aka SSP (slip, slip, purl two together through the back loop). Try a few stitches-worth of [yo, SSP] and you’ll understand why it is not listed in stitch dictionaries or used in patterns—it’s awkward, with a capital AWK! We’re going to conclude yarn over season with Feather Faggotting, a pattern showing how to use faggoting repeats in combination with other stitch patterns. In Feather Faggoting, 2-stitch columns of garter stitch are combined with 2-stitch columns of Purse Stitch.

Yarn Over Plus Purl Two Together Plus Garter Stitch

Looking at the stitch instructions below, note that this pattern requires no selvage stitches. The pattern repeat is written to place one of the garter stitch stitches at the beginning and one at the end, making them next to each other as you work the repeats. The maneuvers for “yo, p2tog” are the same as for Purse Stitch (for a refresher on it, go back one post).

Feather Faggoting (mult of 4 sts)

All rows *k1, yo, p2tog, k1; rep from * to end.

Cast on 20 or so stitches (some multiple of 4, that is). Work a couple of rows in stockinette  or garter stitch to give yourself a nice base. Then work the first row as written above.

When you get to the last few stitches, remember to end “p2tog, k1.” You shouldn’t have any more stitches.

When you turn the work the pattern begins as for Purse Stitch. You’ll see the stitches on the left needle are, from right to left: a purled final stitch (technically half of the garter pair), a right-slanting knit decrease stitch, and then the yarn over strand. After working half of the garter stitch pair, you begin with “yo, p2tog,” knit 1 to finish the repeat, and continue with the next repeat.

The fabric produced incorporates the characteristics of garter stitch you might expect: a more condensed row gauge and fewer stitches per inch than Purse Stitch. The yarn overs twist the same way over each other, but because the rows are more condensed they have less of a “herringbone” quality than in Purse Stitch. The columns of garter and faggoting create vertical textural design elements, making an intriguing fabric that lies flat.

Project

This week’s project is the same as last week’s, albeit with two more stitches in order to meet the repeat requirements of the stitch pattern. Note the gauge difference: more stitches per inch in pattern. Even with two more stitches cast on, this version is not quite as wide as the Purse Stitch version.

Finished measurements 15 inches around x 9 inches deep [38 x 23 cm]

Claudia Hand Painted Yarns Drama (100% linen; 270 yds/3.5 oz [247 m/100 g]): small amount of 1 skein (~40-45 g)
US 6 [3.75mm] needles or size to get gauge
Same size 24 inch [60 cm] circular needle for 3-needle join
F/3.75mm crochet hook
Tapestry needle

Gauge 15 sts and 34 rows = 4 inches [10 cm] in Feather Faggoting, before blocking

LOOSELY cast on 28 stitches. Work Feather Faggoting until piece measures 18 inches [45.5 cm]. Bind off: k2tog, *k1, slip sts back to right needle, k2tog tbl; rep from * to last 2 sts, one on each needle; bind off 1 st, fasten off.

Finishing

Picking up stitches

Picking up stitches

With RS facing and circular needle, pick up and knit 1 st for every 2 rows along side edge to an even number of stitches.

With WS together, fold work at halfway point and pull out cable so needle tips face in same direction. Holding needles parallel,* knit 1 st through both front and back needle; knit second st through front and back; bind off 1 st; repeat from * until all sts have been bound off. Leaving tail, cut and fasten off. Repeat for other side. Weave in ends.

Joining the side edges

With yarn held double and crochet hook make a chain 30 inches [145 cm] long. Working about 1½ inch [4 cm] from top and beginning at side edge, thread drawstring through mesh, overlapping ends at side. Tie ends together.


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Yarn Over Season: Purse Stitch

Purse Stitch post

We’ve looked at the faggoting fabrics produced by the two knit decreases. Now it’s time to try a purl decrease: purl two together (p2tog). The yarn will always begin at the front of the work and go completely around the right needle to get where it needs to be to work the decrease. The resulting fabric is open, with much the same character as Basic Faggoting, and is known in most stitch dictionaries as Purse Stitch.

Yarn Over Plus Purl Two Together

Make a k2tog, turn the work, and what do you see? A p2tog, a right-slanting decrease made with purl stitches. As when a k2tog follows a yarn over, it makes a smooth eyelet, one in which the stitch in the yarn over column of stitches is hidden behind the decrease column stitch.

Purse Stitch (mult of 2 sts +2)

All rows k1, *yo, p2tog; rep from * to last st, k1.

Cast on 20 or so stitches again, and work a couple of rows in stockinette stitch as a base. Then work the first row as written above. I find this stitch pattern to be the easiest of the three to work: the right needle is inserted into the open right side of the first stitch on the left needle and simply continues through to the second. No fuss, no muss, no need to pull the fabric down to expose the holes in the center of the stitches.

Remember to end “p2tog, k1!”

After the first row, when you turn the work you’ll see the stitches on the left needle are, from right to left: a purled selvage, a right-slanting knit decrease stitch, and then the yarn over strand. After working the selvage stitch, you begin the “yo, p2tog” repeat again. In Purse Stitch you insert the right needle into the decrease stitch first, then continue through the yarn over. Because p2tog is a right-slanting decrease the yarn over ends up on top. Continue across the row, again remembering to end with p2tog, k1.

If you’ve been working swatches, you’ll notice the Purse Stitch swatch bears a striking resemblance to the Basic Faggoting swatch. Look at them up close. The structures are reflections of each other, yarn over strands and backbone decreases slanting  in opposite directions. Something to ponder as you make this week’s project!

Difference between basic faggoting and purse stitch

Project

Given its name, it seems like what one should make with Purse stitch is just that: a purse. Or at least a little project bag. I chose to use a bit of sport weight linen left over from a top I designed for Claudia Hand Painted Yarns. Leftover cotton or other firm fiber would work well too.

Finished measurements 16 around x 9 inches deep [40.5 x 23 cm]

Claudia Hand Painted Yarns Drama (100% linen; 270 yds/3.5 oz [247 m/100 g]): small amount of 1 skein (~40-45 g)
US 6 [3.75mm] needles or size to get gauge
Same size 24 inch [60 cm] circular needle for 3-needle join
F/3.75mm crochet hook
Tapestry needle

Gauge 12 sts and 30 rows = 4 inches [10 cm] in Purse Stitch, before blocking

LOOSELY cast on 26 stitches. Work in Purse Stitch until piece measures 18 inches [45.5 cm]. Bind off: k2tog, *k1, slip sts back to right needle, k2tog tbl; rep from * to last 2 sts, one on each needle; bind off 1 st, fasten off.

Finishing

Picking up stitches

Picking up stitches

With RS facing and circular needle, pick up and knit 1 st for every 2 rows along side edge to an even number of stitches.

With WS together, fold work at halfway point and pull out cable so needle tips face in same direction. Holding needles parallel,* knit 1 st through both front and back needle; knit second st through front and back; bind off 1 st; repeat from * until all sts have been bound off. Leaving tail, cut and fasten off. Repeat for other side. Weave in ends.

Joining the side edges

With yarn held double and crochet hook make a chain 30 inches [145 cm] long. Working about 1½ inch [4 cm] from top and beginning at side edge, thread drawstring through mesh, overlapping ends at side. Tie ends together.


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Yarn Over Season: Basic Faggoting

Basic Faggoting post

Yarn over season continues with Basic Faggoting, in which the knit two together (k2tog) decrease is swapped out in favor of slip, slip, knit (ssk). The name would seem to imply it is the fundamental stitch; personally I find it harder to work, and Turkish much easier for first-timers. Get the hang of Turkish stitch, your hands figuring out the necessary micromovements, and the other patterns will be easier. (Need a refresher on yarn over basics? See this post from a couple of weeks ago).

So where does the name come from? Faggoting is a type of needlework in which vertical groups of threads are tied decoratively in bundles. It is often used to join hems together. A quick search for “faggoting needlework” returns some examples. The Victorian Embroidery and Crafts page has some nice diagrams of how the needlework is done. Compare our knit Basic Faggoting fabric to the images and diagrams: pretty darn similar, with threads twisted around each other. So let’s see how our knit version is worked.

Yarn Over Plus Slip, Slip, Knit

As with Turkish and all other patterns of the category, the yarn over is worked first. In this case it is followed by a left-slanting decrease. The decrease points away from the yarn over. If the pair were isolated in a ground of stockinette stitch, the stitch from the “hole” column is on top of the following stitch, visually breaking up the neat column of stitches.

Basic Faggoting (mult of 2 sts +2)

All rows k1, *yo, ssk; rep from * to last st, k1.

Cast on 20 or so stitches, and work a couple of rows in stockinette stitch  to give yourself a nice base. Then work the first row as written above. When working an ssk, I find I often use my left thumb and forefinger to pull the fabric down when inserting the left needle back through the two slipped stitches, and to hold the stitches in place when pulling the yarn through . When working with the yarn in my left hand, I use my right index finger to hold the yarn over in place as I work the ssk. These micro movements work for my hands; your hands may require different ones. Give them (your hands) time to figure out what will make them happy—they are smarter than our brain much of the time!

When you get to the last few stitches, remember to end “ssk, k1.”

 

After the first row, when you turn the work you’ll see the stitches on the left needle are, from right to left: a purled selvage, a left-slanting purled decrease stitch, and then the yarn over strand. After working the selvage stitch, you begin the “yo, ssk” repeat again. Notice what this means: when you work the ssk after the yarn over, you slip the decrease stitch, then the yarn over. The decrease stitch ends up on top. Continue across the row, again remembering to end with ssk, k1.

The fabric produced by working successive yarn over / ssk pairs  in this way is by nature open and flat. The difference between unstretched is barely noticeable. The zigzags in the column of decreases are in the same plane. In Turkish stitch they are just slightly in front/back of each other. The same is true of the zig-zagging lattice of yarn overs. And the yarn overs appear twisted around each other in Basic Faggoting, while in Turkish they simply cross over/under. Fascinating.

Basic Faggoting, unstretched and stretched

Project

Basic faggoting fabric is naturally open, rather than collapsible like its sister Turkish fabric. I choose another Colinette yarn, this time a wool and cotton twisted together, Prism.

Use a slipped-stitch selvage instead of the k1s at each side in the swatch instructions. This gives a nice edge, and it makes it a bit simpler to seam: 1 slipped edge stitch to 1 stitch at bottom or top (depending on which edge you fold!).

Finished measurements approximately 12 x 40 inches [32 x 103 cm]

Collinette Prism (90% wool, 10% nylon; 126 yds/3.5 oz [115 m/100 g]): 2 skeins
US 15 [mm] needles or size to get gauge
Tapestry needle

Gauge 10 sts = 4 inches [10 cm] in Basic Faggoting Stitch

LOOSELY cast on 30 stitches; knit 1 row.

All rows slip 1 purlwise with yarn in front, *yo, ssk; rep from * to last st, k1.

Work as above until piece measures approximately 40 inches [103 cm]. Knit 1 row; bind off loosely. Fold one end to one side as shown in this post and seam.


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Yarn Over Season: Turkish Stitch

Turkish Stitch post

The last post defined the thing knitters do to make holes in fabric on purpose (“yarn over”) rather than by accident (“oopsie”). Via  words and animated gifs, it showed how to make them between different types of stitches as well as with yarn held in the left hand and yarn in the right hand. Now, those are my left and right hands, and the way you hold yarn and needles may not look exactly the same. As long as whatever you do gets the yarn from where is after making the first stitch on the right needle, over the right needle to make the yarn over, and to where it needs to be to make the next stitch!

A yarn over adds a stitch to your total stitch count. Much like wine goes with cheese, a yarn over goes with a decrease, and keeps the stitch count constant. Which decrease and its placement, before or after the yarn over, determines the overall look in the fabric.

In this post and the ones that follow we’re going to look at several easy-to-remember stitch patterns containing little else but pairs of yarn overs and decreases. All have a mesh-like appearance, and can be used as overall fabric, in panels, and as horizontal and vertical insertions in other fabrics. As a class they are sometimes referred to as faggoting.

Yarn Over Plus Knit Two Together

The first stitch pattern we are going to look at pairs the yarn over with a knit two together (k2tog) decrease. It’s known as Turkish Stitch. The yarn over is worked first and the k2tog follows. As a right-slanting decrease which puts the left stitch of the pair on top of the right, the decrease points toward the yarn over. If the pair were isolated in a ground of stockinette stitch, the stitch in the “hole” column disappears behind the decrease column and is a very unobtrusive pairing.

There is only one row, comprised of our yarn over/decrease pair repeated between a knit selvage stitch at each side.

Turkish Stitch (mult of 2 sts +2)

All rows k1, *yo, k2tog; rep from * to last st, k1.

Cast on 20 or so stitches, and work a couple of rows in stockinette stitch  to give yourself a nice base. Then work the first row as written above. Regardless of which hand you hold the yarn in, it can be helpful to pull the fabric below the first two stitches on the left needle down; it can make it easier to insert the needles into the two stitches. When you get to the last few stitches, remember to end “k2tog, k1!” It’s all too easy to continue the rhythm of yo between knits, and add an extra yo before the selvage stitch. And that will completely mess up what follows!

 

After the first row, when you turn the work you’ll see the stitches on the left needle are, from right to left: a purled selvage, a right-slanting purled decrease stitch, and then the yarn over strand. After working the selvage stitch, you begin the “yo, k2tog” repeat again. Notice what this means: when you work the k2tog, you insert the right needle into/under the yarn over first, continuing into the k2tog stitch. The yarn over ends up on top. Continue across the row, again remembering to end with k2tog, k1.

The fabric produced by working successive yarn over / k2tog pairs  in this way is wonderfully elastic. At rest the dominant feature of the fabric is its diagonal lines, created by yarn over strands  and k2togs of the front that slant in the same direction. Pull it open even slightly, and the yarn over strands from the back show through. You see a zig-zag lattice of yarn strands, as well as zig-zag columns of decreases.

Turkish Stitch, unstretched and stretched

Project

What better way to take advantage of Turkish Stitch fabric’s stretchy nature than to use it in one of my favorite shawlette shapes?! I’ve also used a tape yarn with some stretch, an oldie but a goodie from Colinette.

You’ll use a slipped-stitch selvage instead of the k1s at each side as above. This gives a nice edge, and it makes it a bit simpler to seam: 1 slipped edge stitch to 1 stitch at bottom or top (depending on which edge you fold!).

Finished measurements 12 x 40 inches [30.5 x 101.5 cm]

Collinette Tagliatielli (90% wool, 10% nylon; 175 yds/3.5 oz [160 m/100 g]): 1 skein
US 15 [10.0 mm] needles or size to get gauge
Tapestry needle

Gauge 10 sts = 4 inches [10 cm] in Turkish Stitch, slightly stretched

LOOSELY cast on 30 stitches; knit 1 row.

All rows slip 1 purlwise with yarn in front, *yo, k2tog; rep from * to last st, k1.

Work as above until there is approximately 9 feet [ 2.75 m] of yarn left. Knit 1 row; bind off loosely. Fold one end to one side as shown in this post and seam.


Back in the day I was obsessed with faggoting stitches, as well as capelettes. And Colinette yarns. My Delores Cape pattern uses all three, naturally. Read more here or on my Ravelry pattern store.

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